3 Great Capes

Cape de Bonne Espérance, Leeuwin & Horn.

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In sailing, the great capes are three major capes of the continents in the Southern Ocean — Africa’s Cape of Good Hope, Australia’s Cape Leeuwin, and South America’s Cape Horn.

A great cape, for us, can’t be expressed in longitude and latitude alone. A great cape has a soul, with very soft, very violent shadows and colours. A soul as smooth as a child’s, as hard as a criminal’s. And that is why we go. – BERNARD MOITESSIER

ClipperRoute

The traditional clipper route followed the winds of the roaring forties south of the great capes. Due to the significant hazards they presented to shipping, the great capes became significant landmarks in ocean voyaging. A circumnavigation via the great capes is considered to be a noteworthy achievement.

Cape of Good Hope

The Cape of Good Hope is at the southern tip of the Cape Peninsula (South Africa), about 2.3 km  west and a little south of Cape Point on the south-east corner.

As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has long been of special significance to sailors, many of whom refer to it simply as “the Cape“.

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The first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although Herodotus mentioned a claim that the Phoenicians had done so far earlier). Dias called the cape Cabo das Tormentas (“Cape of Storms”; Dutch: Stormkaap), which was the original name of the “Cape of Good Hope”.

The Cape of Good Hope is the legendary home of The Flying Dutchman. Crewed by tormented and damned ghostly sailors, it is doomed forever to beat its way through the adjacent waters without ever succeeding in rounding the headland.

Adamastor is a Greek-type mythological character invented by the Portuguese poet Luís de Camões in his epic poem Os Lusíadas (first printed in 1572), as a symbol of the forces of nature Portuguese navigators had to overcome during their discoveries and more specifically of the dangers Portuguese sailors faced when trying to round the Cape of Storms.

Cape Leeuwin

Cape Leeuwin is the most south-westerly mainland point of the Australian Continent, in the state of Western Australia. In Australia, the Cape is considered the point where the Indian Ocean meets the Southern Ocean.

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Matthew Flinders named Cape Leeuwin after the first known ship to have visited the area is the Leeuwin (“Lioness”), a Dutch vessel that charted some of the nearby coastline in 1622.

Cape Horn

Cape Horn (Spanish: Cabo de Hornos) is the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago of southern Chile, and is located on the small Hornos Island. Although not the most southerly point of South America (which are the Diego Ramírez Islands), Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans meet.

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Cape Horn was discovered and first rounded by the Dutchman Willem Schouten, who named it Kaap Hoorn  after the city of Hoorn in the Netherlands.

The waters around Cape Horn are particularly hazardous, owing to strong winds, large waves, strong currents and icebergs; these dangers have made it notorious as a sailors’ graveyard. Sailing around the Horn is widely regarded as one of the major challenges in yachting.

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Several factors combine to make the passage around Cape Horn one of the most hazardous shipping routes in the world: the fierce sailing conditions prevalent in the Southern Ocean generally; the geography of the passage south of the Horn; and the extreme southern latitude of the Horn, at 56° south. The prevailing winds in latitudes below 40° south can blow from west to east around the world almost uninterrupted by land, giving rise to the “roaring forties” and the even more wild “furious fifties” and “screaming sixties”. These winds are exacerbated at the Horn by the funneling effect of the Andes and the Antarctic peninsula, which channel the winds into the relatively narrow Drake Passage. The strong winds of the Southern Ocean give rise to correspondingly large waves; these waves can attain great height as they roll around the Southern Ocean, free of any interruption from land. At the Horn, however, these waves encounter an area of shallow water to the south of the Horn, which has the effect of making the waves shorter and steeper, greatly increasing the hazard to ships. If the strong eastward current through the Drake Passage encounters an opposing east wind, this can have the effect of further building up the waves. In addition to these “normal” waves, the area west of the Horn is particularly notorious for rogue waves, which can attain heights of up to 30 meters. Ice is a hazard to sailors venturing far below 40° south. Although the ice limit dips south around the horn, icebergs are a significant hazard for vessels in the area. In the South Pacific in February icebergs are generally confined to below 50° south; but in August the iceberg hazard can extend north of 40° south. Even in February, the Horn is well below the latitude of the iceberg limit. These hazards have made the Horn notorious as perhaps the most dangerous ship passage in the world; many ships were wrecked, and many sailors died attempting to round the Cape.

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Owing to the remoteness of the location and the hazards there, a rounding of Cape Horn is widely considered to be the yachting equivalent of climbing Mount Everest, and so many sailors seek it for its own sake.

Source: Wikipedia

Cover photo: Francois Denis

Tour du Monde à la voile

Sailing around the World 2018/19…

HIR 3 is getting ready for another great adventure… We will sail around the World in 2018/19! Our route…

TOUR DU MONDE à la voile:

  1. Poreč – Cagliari (June 2018) – 10 days
  2. Cagliari – Gibraltar (July 2018) – 10 days
  3. Gibraltar – Canaries (July 2018) – 10 days
  4. Canaries – Cabo Verde (July 2018) – 10 days
  5. Cabo Verde – Cape Town (August/September 2018) – 45 days
  6. Cape Town – Freemanlte (September-November 2018) – 50 days
  7. Freemantle – Melbourne (November 2018) – 20 days
  8. Melbourne – Wellington (December 2018) – 20 days
  9. Wellington – Puerto Williams (December-February 2018/19) – 55 days
  10. Puerto Williams – Buenos Aires (February/March 2019) – 15 days
  11. Buenos Aires – Rio de Janeiro (March 2019) – 15 days
  12. Rio de Janeiro – Recife (March/April 2019) – 15 days
  13. Recife – Azores (April/May 2019) – 30 days
  14. Azores – Gibraltar ( May/June 2019) – 10 days
  15. Gibraltar – Malta (June 2019) – 15 days
  16. Malta – Poreč (June 2019) – 10 days

Join us… sasa.fegic@gmail.com

5 low-budget gifts for a sailor

Sailing equipment is very expensive, but here is a list of Top 5 gifts for a sailor if you are on a budget…

1. Seahorse magazine subscription

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A great gift for a sailor is a subscription to a favorite sailing magazine. Seahorse magazine is ideal for a racing sailor.

2. SailGrib Weather Routing

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The most important question on a boat is always what the weather is going to do, so a subscription for SailGrib weather routing makes a perfect gift…

3. Hei-Matau

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These very stylized hand crafted New Zealand Maori fish hook bone carvings and necklaces represent prosperity, abundance, fertility and strength. Hei-Matau are also seen as good luck charms, particularly for those traveling over water.

4. Rick Tomilson Porfolio Calendar

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Every edition of the highly acclaimed Rick Tomlinson Portfolio Calendar features 12 spectacular images from recent assignments around the world. Action and art has always been the Portfolio Calendar theme.

5. Yeti Rambler Colster

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Sailors love beer and this keeps your hand from getting cold and your beer from getting warm—what could be better:)? Yeti Rambler Colster is basically a thermos for your can of beer that will keep your brew cold for a very long time. You could also just use it as an insulated tumbler and pour whatever you wanted in there, hot or cold.

Top 10 Sailor’s Drinks

Everything you need in a ship’s bar…

It’s important to drink on board to stay hydrated, but to drink well is good for the morale of the crew;)… so here is my Top 10 list of the best sailor’s drinks…

10. Twinings Tea
Tea (with, or without the rum;) is a great boat drink, it goes well at any time of day and it’s perfect for keeping your hands warm during long and cold night watches…

9. Nescafe Cap Colombie
Coffee is a great way to wake up and it keeps you alert during night watches. Nescafe Cap Colombie is easy to make on the boat and it tastes great with 100% Arabica beans from the finest regions in South America and roast them lightly to achieve a medium bodied coffee taste with a wonderful honey finish…. and if you can install a machine on the galley, you can also enjoy a good Nespresso, like Emirates Team New Zealand:) 

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8. Red Wine
Nearly all scientific researches show the positive medical benefits of red wine consumption… and it is common knowledge that wine tastes better on the boat:)

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7. Grey Goose
Grey Goose was named the best-tasting vodka in the world by the Beverage Testing Institute. As advertised, it goes great ‘on the rocks’ after sailing with oysters in the cockpit…

6. Johhnie Walker Blue Label
Johnnie Walker Blue Label is blended to recreate the character and taste of some of the earliest whisky blends created in the 19th century. If it’s good enough for Jude Law and Giancarlo Giannini on a Baglietto Sailing Yacht, it’s certainly good enough for me:)

5. Heineken
Beer is great to drink to have while sailing, to celebrate a safe landfall, or when partying on shore and Heineken is the world’s most international premium beer that sponsors a popular St Maarten Heineken Regatta… 

4. Chivas Regal
Chivas Regal is the flagship Scotch whisky brand with a perfect motto: ‘Live with Chivalry!’ which is encouraging us to live life with honor, loyalty and gallantry. It is stronger than simply an act. It is about staying true to your word and leading by example, standing up for what you believe in no matter what.

3. Captain Morgan
World-famous dark rum named after Captain Henry Morgan, the famous Welsh swashbuckler who became the governor of Jamaica with the best slogan: ‘To Life, Love and Loot’.

2. Beck’s
Beer is always a popular drink on board… and what better brand to have than the one that sponsors a greet tall ship Alexander von Humboldt with green sails!

1. Jameson

Jameson – blended Irish whiskey doesn’t need ice, so it’s not only a perfect ingredient for Irish Coffee, but a great drink for celebrating that perfect moments on board;)

Drink responsibly!

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Keep it simple!

To be successful at sea we must keep things simple.

To be successful at sea we must keep things simple. – R.D. (PETE) CULLER

Shipyards are building bigger and bigger boats and equipment are getting more and more sophisticated and that’s great for comfortable cruising, but everything is becoming really expensive and complicated.

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Although it’s nice to have electric pumps, hydraulic swimming platforms, push-button sail adjustment, electronics and cool gadgets, we must accept the fact that all these systems eventually stop working (usually at the worst possible moment). If you don’t have them on board, they won’t brake and you’ll be able to enjoy sailing, instead of fixing things. Nobody likes gadgets more than me, but I like simplicity on the boat better…. So, my philosophy is: KEEP IT SIMPLE!

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Top 10 Sailing Songs

Sound of Sailing… Top 10!

My list of Top 10 Sailing Songs…

1. Sailing – Rod Stewart

2. Sail Away – David Gray

 

3. Sail Away – The Rasmus

 

4. Sailing – Christopher Cross

5. Van Morrison – Into The Mystic

6. Sail On – The Commodores

7. Sail Away – Deep Purple

8. All At Sea – Jamie Cullum

9. Ship of Fools – Robert Plant

10. Oceans – Coldplay