Looking for the summer

A collection of some of the best photos taken on board HIR 3 this summer. Thanks to everyone who dared to join me on board:)!

A collection of some of the best photos taken on board HIR 3 this summer. Thanks to everyone who dared to join me on board:)!

You can still join me… just fill out this form:  http://goo.gl/forms/CTH1fivtGpAG2pPt1

She

In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

darling

One prosaic explanation is that the gender of the Latin word for “ship” — Navis — is feminine. But people generally agree on the more romantic notion of the ‘ship as a she’ phenomenon: that it stems from the tradition of boat-owners, typically and historically male, naming their vessels after significant women in their lives — wives, sweethearts, mothers. Similarly, and more broadly, ships were once dedicated to goddesses, and later also to mortal women of national or historic significance, thereby bestowing a benevolent feminine spirit on the vessels that would carry seafarers across treacherous oceans. Figureheads on the prows of ships were often depictions of such female namesakes, denoting the name of the ship for a largely illiterate maritime population. (Source: Glossophilia)

mike-peyton-postcards14

It is often asked why a ship is called a “she”.
The answer is simple:
there is usually a gang of men about her;
it takes an experienced man to handle her correctly, and a lot of paint to keep her look good;
and without a man at the helm, she is absolutely uncontrollable.
She shows her topsides, hiders her bottom and, when coming into port, always heads for the buoys. it is not the initial expense that breaks you, it is the upkeep.

solo8098

Yacht design, as carried on at present, is rather like making love to a woman. The approach is completely empirical. At the end, the male, even though he might be successful, usually had no idea of just how and why he had succeeded. – PROF. E.J.RICHARDS

12805789_1182709045095170_9028939270233014687_n

A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder. – ADM. CHESTER NIMITZ

13a2a1ab3f783bc71c912ae41a85578c

Boats, like whiskey, are all good. – R.D.(PETE) CULLER

480757_10200242896649753_564165065_n1

The fact that one refers to a boat as “she” shows that since time began men have loved their boats. – FRANCIS KINNEY

Gone Sailing… Finally!

On our first sailing trip from Kraljevica to Kornati and back to Poreč, we covered about 350 miles… and our adventure is only beginning! If you would like to join us, please contact me…

HIR has been in Kraljevica Shipyard on dry berth for almost three months now… I am a patient man, but even I became nervous and was thinking if I would ever set sail…. but then, finally… After we’ve put new antifouling, engine was fixed, mast step and all shrouds and lifelines were replaced, we painted the mast, put the new windex on top, roll system was serviced, new halyards were in place and mast was stepped and trimmed properly… we were ready to sail away:)!

IMG_0192

There is still a lot of work to be done, but housing sails and first sailing on board HIR 3 after more than two years of refit deserved a proper champagne and whiskey that I opened after I’ve put a coin under the mast…

IMG_0196

Gone sailing… finally! What a great feeling! 🙂

IMG_0185

On our first sailing trip from Kraljevica to Kornati and back to Poreč, we covered about 350 miles… and our adventure is only beginning! If you would like to join us, please just fill out this form: http://goo.gl/forms/CTH1fivtGpAG2pPt1

1001460_10200674863448653_1438109470_n

Something’s missing…

semi-annual-safety-checklist

We have been working on the boat for quite some time now, but there is still a lot of expensive equipment that we have to install. Friends and colleagues have been halping me and donating useful things which helped us a lot… THANK YOU ALL!

I decided to make an equipment list in google docs that will be updated constantly as we progress, so if by any chance, you have something useful for us… we would really appreciate it;)

Equipment list: LINK

7a3ffb11c078433a262a2e7a7e2b03ef

What a feeling

It’s the time of year when the boat has to go out of the water for spring preparations, so I organized everything and went to Vrsar with Elvis to do some serious work…

It’s the time of year when the boat has to go out of the water for spring preparations, so I organized everything and went to Vrsar with Elvis to do some serious work. The mariners from the marina towed the boat to the crane, they took the boat with a crane to a dry berth… and we immediately started working.

IMG_4408

First, we put the tape on the waterline and sanded the hull, cleaned the prop shaft and the propeller, then we put three coats of antifouling, new sacrificial anodes, greased the seacocks, and polished the hull above the waterline… but we had more serious work to do now – it was finally the time to put back and install the engine!

IMG_4419

My friend Zoran from Poreč and his cousin helped us a lot by borrowing us a car with a trailer,  so we all went to find the village where the mechanic who did an overhaul of the engine lives. It was quite an adventure. When we got lost for the second time, we asked one lady on the street if she new Filip… and of course, she new where he lived:) The four of us lifted the engine, put it on the trailer and headed back to the marina. It was already 10pm when we got there and one concerned german boat owner started inquiring what we were doing, but Elvis managed to convince him that everything was ok.

IMG_4423

The next day the service guys craned the boat back in the water and lowered the engine in place when in started raining. Luckily, my good friend Kruno was there again… He worked and worked, and worked… and managed to install the engine by 10pm… THANK YOU KRUNO!!

IMG_4426

The morning after, we motored out of Vrsar harbor for the first time in ten years! What a feeling!!!

Long time no see

It’s been a long time since I have been on the boat, but now finally the time has come to start work again.

It’s been a long time since I have been on the boat, but now finally the time has come to start work again. I’ve filled my car with new floorboards, toilet, repaired stainless steel fuel tank, new pipes, exhaust system, tools… and went to Vrsar. I worked alone for four days and managed to get some work done, but I also discovered some more problems that I didn’t know I have. For example, I have to find a way to lock a fuel tank in an optimum position, I need a new fuel filter, a few new floorboards… However, I did manage to get some work done, but since I was on my own, I only took one picture, before I started…

IMG_4337

Long winter

It has been a while since I’ve been in Vrsar on the boat and I have to admit that I don’t feel good about it. In the meantime, my friend Zoran from Poreč is constantly checking that everything is ok with the boat and occasionally pumps out the water from the bilges.

IMG_20150124_123835

It has been a while since I’ve been in Vrsar on the boat and I have to admit that I don’t feel good about it. In the meantime, my friend Zoran from Poreč is constantly checking that everything is ok with the boat, sends me pictures and occasionally pumps out the water from the bilges, since it’s raining a lot and I still haven’t sealed the interior completely. It’s really nice to have friends who enjoy working on boats… so THANK YOU Zoran!!!

IMG_20150127_105854

IMG_20150127_111445

IMG_20150124_122916

Every little helps

It’s been a while now since I returned home to Zagreb and I am getting a bit frustrated because everything seems to be happening very slowly, but my friends are trying to help me.

It’s been a while now since I returned home to Zagreb and I am getting a bit frustrated because everything seems to be happening very slowly, but my friends are trying to help me.

Maja bought a new Croatian flag, info chart, teak oil, polishing paste for stainless steel and a cleaner for the water tank, Zoran was in Vrsar the other day and noticed that one of the stern lines snapped, so he replaced it and said that he will pump out the water from the bilges, I was in Rijeka with Elvis and we bought a new exhaust pipe for the engine, gelcoat filler and a new windex and we ordered a new stainless steel fuel tank.

The progress is slow… but every little helps. 🙂

Hagar

Tender to HIR 3

Recently I found a good old rubber dinghy for a great price. I went to see it, I liked it and bought it.

I constantly browse ads on the internet in search for good deals on boat equipment. Recently I found a good old rubber dinghy for a great price. I went to see it, I liked it and bought it. I just have to repair a couple of small things on it and it will be my new tender to HIR 3…

ris-2-duljina-2.6m-slika-39737168

My way

Whenever you are starting a new project, people are always keen on giving their opinions and advices. The same thing happened to me when I was thinking about buying ‘Hir 3’. I will probably do everything MY WAY! 🙂

Whenever you are starting a new project, people are always keen on giving their opinions and advices. The same thing happened to me when I was thinking about buying ‘Hir 3’. It was interesting because my friends who are beginners in sailing, or don’ even sail at all supported my idea… but people who I think know quite a bit about boats were all very much against me buying a boat in such a bad condition and they wanted to talk me out of it…

BkmeujdCMAAbr-l

I decided to buy ‘HIR 3’ because I just thought it was the right thing to do and that if I didn’t do it, that I would probably wonder for the rest of my life if I should have done it.

BqaPB7DIYAA-quQ

Now that I started restoring her, everyone support me (at least they say that they do:), but again everyone has their own idea what I should do and how I should do it. Some people say that I should completely remove the interior and start from scratch, others have ideas on what to do with the deck equipment… I fell lucky that over the years I have learned a thing or two about boats, so I always listen to what everyone has to say, but in the end… I will probably do everything MY WAY! 🙂