She

In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

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In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

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One prosaic explanation is that the gender of the Latin word for “ship” — Navis — is feminine. But people generally agree on the more romantic notion of the ‘ship as a she’ phenomenon: that it stems from the tradition of boat-owners, typically and historically male, naming their vessels after significant women in their lives — wives, sweethearts, mothers. Similarly, and more broadly, ships were once dedicated to goddesses, and later also to mortal women of national or historic significance, thereby bestowing a benevolent feminine spirit on the vessels that would carry seafarers across treacherous oceans. Figureheads on the prows of ships were often depictions of such female namesakes, denoting the name of the ship for a largely illiterate maritime population. (Source: Glossophilia)

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It is often asked why a ship is called a “she”.
The answer is simple:
there is usually a gang of men about her;
it takes an experienced man to handle her correctly, and a lot of paint to keep her look good;
and without a man at the helm, she is absolutely uncontrollable.
She shows her topsides, hiders her bottom and, when coming into port, always heads for the buoys. it is not the initial expense that breaks you, it is the upkeep.

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Yacht design, as carried on at present, is rather like making love to a woman. The approach is completely empirical. At the end, the male, even though he might be successful, usually had no idea of just how and why he had succeeded. – PROF. E.J.RICHARDS

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A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder. – ADM. CHESTER NIMITZ

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Boats, like whiskey, are all good. – R.D.(PETE) CULLER

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The fact that one refers to a boat as “she” shows that since time began men have loved their boats. – FRANCIS KINNEY

Coin under the mast

Sailors and shipwrights have been putting coins under masts of ships since the ancient times. We found an interesting one on HIR 3!!!

I was cleaning the bilges with a sponge which was a really dirty job, but someone had to do it. Water was brown, it wasn’t pleasant and it seemed like it would never end with the water coming from all over the place. There was a lot of small rotten plywood parts inside the bilges, but I came across a round object that seemed a bit different, so I stopped and had a quick look. It seemed like a coin, but it was covered in dirt and I couldn’t really see what it was. I showed it to Maja. She immediately went to the pontoon to clean it so we could se what it was…

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It was really cool to see a coin which actually turned out to be a medal from 1981. Adriatic Regatta for 2nd place in category IV!

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‘Sailors and shipwrights have been putting coins under masts of ships since the ancient times. The ceremonial practice is believed to originate from ancient Rome. One theory is that, due to the dangers of early sea travel, the coins were placed under the mast so the crew would be able to cross to the afterlife if the ship were sunk. The Romans believed it was necessary for a person to take coins with them to pay Charon, in order to cross the river Styx to the afterlife and as a result of this, coins were placed in the mouths of the dead before they were buried. Another theory for this practice is that the insertion of coins in buildings and ships may have functioned as a form of sacrifice thanking the gods for a successful construction, or a request for divine protection in the future (Wikipedia)’.

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Now I know what I have to do with the medal. I will keep it safe until we put the boat in better shape… and than we will organize a ceremony to put the it in place under the mast. I can’t wait! 🙂

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I showed the medal to my friends at Dobro More sailing club in Zagreb and my friend Jelena offered to clean the medal with a special acid for bronze… she brought it a week later looking like this… Great!! 🙂 Thanks a lot Jelena!!

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